FRIDAY 11 MAY
 
WAITING FOR THE LAST BUS
10am
St James’ Church
£7 Free to full-time students

Post-talk refreshments in aid of Church funds

Where do we go when we die? Or is there nowhere to go? Is death something we can do or is it just something that happens to us?
Richard Holloway is back by popular demand after his 2017 talk on his highly regarded book A Little History of Religion. This year he presents a positive, meditative and profound exploration of the many important lessons we can learn from death: facing up to the limitations of our bodies as they falter, reflecting on our failings, and forgiving ourselves and others. An invitation to reconsider life’s greatest mystery by one of the most important and beloved religious leaders of our time.
Richard Holloway now in his ninth decade has spent a lifetime at the bedsides of the dying, guiding countless men and women towards peaceful deaths. He was Bishop of Edinburgh from 1986 and from 1992 Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church. He resigned both positions in 2000. He is well known for his support of progressive causes. He has reviewed for many publications including The Times, The Guardian, Sunday Herald, and The Scotsman. His more than twenty books include the best selling Leaving Alexandria: A Memoir of Faith and Doubt. He is a frequent presenter on Radio and Television.

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GRENFELL HOPE
11.45am
St James’ Church
£7 Free to full-time students

Pre-talk refreshments in aid of Church funds

Gaby Doherty outlines what it was like living in North Kensington before and after the fire on 14th June 2017 at Grenfell Tower, the 24-storey block of public housing flats.
She and her husband Sean and their four children live in a flat across from Grenfell Tower, and Sean (a Church of England minister) was the first clergy person on the scene. Gaby’s account features the testimony of and commentary on the community that experienced the fire, and the amazing storiesof hope that followed in its wake. With short readings by Auriol Smith and Sam Walters.
Gaby Doherty was born a farmer’s granddaughter who from the age of 5-18 lived on a farm in rural Somerset with the nearest shops three miles away. After studying English at Reading and then Theology at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, her faith led her to volunteer in Nottingham in an Urban Priority Area. She wanted to live alongside the poor, a condition she insisted upon when Sean asked her to marry him! For three years Gaby and Sean worked in a multicultural church in Cricklewood, before Gaby and Sean moved to West London .
Sam Walters MBE, educated at Merton College Oxford, trained as an actor at LAMDA. He retired in 2014 as Artistic Director of the Orange Tree Theatre in Richmond, London which he founded in 1971 and ran for 42 years! He also directed in the West End, in many regional theatres, and at drama schools.
Auriol Smith is an actor, theatre director, and founder member and former associate director of the Orange Tree Theatre. She has also directed in the West End, regional theatres and at the Central School of Speech and Drama.

With thanks to St James’ Church, Richard Stephens, Sally Dymott and Ailsa Scott

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PATCHWORK POETS
3pm
Church Rooms
£5 To include tea or coffee

Ann Allen hosts this inclusive poetry session: first the Patchwork Poets, who meet regularly, will give a presentation of their poems, and then there will be an opportunity for audience members to share their work.
Ann’s first poetry collection is Michelangelo Can Paint an Angel.

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FILM MATINEE: PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK
3pm
Court Room Old Police Station
£5

(1hour 55 mins)

Starring Rachel Roberts and directed by Peter Weir, the 1975 film Picnic at Hanging Rock is an adaptation of Joan Lindsay’s 1967 book, arguably one of the most important Australian novels of all time. The ethereal opening sequences focus on the inexplicable disappearance of three girls and a mistress on an innocent school outing in 1900. The film goes on to explore the repercussions of this, setting Victorian morality, values and hypocrisy against a gothic Australian background, enhancing the sense of “other” ness and the supernatural. There are parallels with today’s society – press intrusion, mass hysteria, mob rule and alienation – and with Shakespeare’s The Tempest, where a similar unravelling of society creates a climate of other worldliness.
‘has a hypnotic spell’ The New York Times
‘a legend that went viral well before the word as we know it existed’ (2014) The Guardian
With thanks to Campden Film Society

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WOMEN AT THE CENTRE OF SHAKESPEARE’S STAGE
7pm
Chipping Campden School Hall
£14 Free to full-time students

Doors open 6.30pm TOKE’S Bar There will an interval

Harriet Walter in conversation with Sam Walters and Auriol Smith on Harriet’s remarkable acting career as told in her book on the exploration of the Shakespearean canon through the eyes of a self-identified ‘feminist actor’.
Harriet Walter CBE has played almost all of Shakespeare’s heroines, notably Ophelia, Helena, Portia, Viola, Imogen, Lady Macbeth, Beatrice and Cleopatra, mostly for the Royal Shakespeare Company. Her Brutus at the all female production of Julius Caesar at Donmar Warehouse was widely acclaimed and was soon followed by Henry IV. Harriet has also played numerous other great classical stage roles including the Duchess of Malfi, Hedda Gabler and Linda in Death of a Salesman and has created many roles in new plays such as Arcadia and Sweet Panic.
She has also starred in countless films and in television dramas. Her other books are Other People’s Shoes, Macbeth and Facing It
Sam Walters MBE, educated at Merton College Oxford, trained as an actor at LAMDA. He retired in 2014 as Artistic Director of the Orange Tree Theatre in Richmond, London which he founded in 1971 and ran for 42 years! He also directed in the West End, in many regional theatres, and at drama schools.
Auriol Smith is an actor, theatre director, and founder member and former associate director of the Orange Tree Theatre. She has also directed in the West End, regional theatres and at the Central School of Speech and Drama.

INTERVAL

The co-editors of Much Ado About Nothing: A Critical Reader Peter J Smith and Deborah Cartmell join Harriet Walter and Auriol Smith for a panel discussion on arguably Shakespeare’s funniest play Much Ado about Nothing. Chaired by Sam Walters.
Peter J Smith, reader in Renaissance literature at Nottingham Trent University, and former trustee of the British Shakespeare Association, is the author of Between Two Stools and Social Shakespeare. He has published recently on Othello on screen and  Derek Jarman’s film version of The Tempest.
Deborah Cartmell is Professor of English at De Montfort University. She has contributed to numerous publications on screen adaptations of literary texts.

This event is sponsored by Cotswold House Hotel and Spa
www.bespokehotels.com/cotswoldhouse

With thanks to TOKE’S Food and Drink Tel: 01386 849345
www.tokesfoodanddrink.co.uk

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